The Fast Ferry Divergence

Articles: The Theories

The Fast Ferry Divergence

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In vector calculus, divergence is a vector operator that measures the magnitude of a vector field’s source or sink at a given point, in terms of a signed scalar.

More technically, the divergence represents the volume density of the outward flux of a vector field from an infinitesimal volume around a given point.

For example, consider air as it is heated or cooled. The relevant vector field for this example is the velocity of the moving air at a point. If air is heated in a region it will expand in all directions such that the velocity field points outward from that region. Therefore the divergence of the velocity field in that region would have a positive value, as the region is a source. If the air cools and contracts, the divergence is negative and the region is called a sink.

In our case, the Seaphantom’s speed, range and lower fuel cost create a vast divergence in the fast ferry market with variables expanding in all directions as measured by schedules, routes and transit times.

Divergence